A Look Behind the Books, A New Christian Inspirational Trilogy, Catholic, Christian inspirational Fiction, Riding Out the Wreckage

Can Jordan Peterson Be a Good Example to Catholics? Bishop Barron Helps Me Decide

12 Rules Cover

The positive effect Dr. Jordan Peterson’s 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos are having on the youth of today, especially young men, is undeniable. Though a big fan of his, I was still concerned that his views may be at odds with Catholic teaching.

I am currently writing the third book in The Father Michael Trilogy and looking for a realistic way to bring hope to Joe Harper and those who suffer like him with ulcerative colitis or other IBDs.

Joe comes from a Catholic family, so is Dr. Peterson a good spiritual father for him?

 

Peterson Portrait Photo
Photo By Gage Skidmore, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=70242230

Dr. Peterson Attacks Nihilism

Life is difficult and Dr. Peterson doesn’t sugarcoat the fact.  His is not a ‘feel-good’ book, which makes a refreshing change.

But he stresses that throwing our hands up in despair is irresponsible and the easy way out. ‘Everything is horrible, there’s nothing I can (want) to do about it, so what is the point of existence? I’ll just feel sorry for myself and make everyone else around me more miserable, too.’

Instead Dr. Peterson urges us to stand up and voluntarily accept ‘the burden of Being’ and ‘the terrible responsibility of life, with eyes wide open.’ ‘There is evil to overcome, suffering to ameliorate, and yourself to better.’ We must make whatever sacrifices are needed in order to ‘generate a productive and meaningful reality (it means acting to please God, in the ancient language.)’

Christ ‘outlines … the proper aim of mankind’ in the Sermon on the Mount. We must ‘aim at the highest good’ which puts us on a heavenward trajectory and ‘makes (us) hopeful.’

The psychologist urges us not to make the world a worse place but a better place. Either we are advancing the world towards Hell or towards Heaven. Which do we want to inhabit?

He points to history, warning us of the extremes to which people will go when they don’t take on the burden for improving life but instead seek scapegoats for their unhappiness. They become bitter, resentful, vengeful and ultimately murderous. He reminds us of the excesses of Hitler, Stalin, and the Communist Party in China and Russia in the 20th Century. Extreme right and extreme left ideologies are equally dangerous.

In Our Lord’s prayer we ask that “Thy Kingdom come, Thy Will be done, on earth as it is in Heaven” and Dr. Peterson states clearly, ‘To place the alleviation of unnecessary pain and suffering at the pinnacle of your hierarchy of value is to work to bring about the Kingdom of God on Earth.’ This viewpoint does not conflict with Catholicism or Christianity in general.

He tells us to meet suffering head on and be heroes – a great message for the lost young men of today. What a worthy challenge! Be the hero who reduces the suffering of others.

That is, after all, is Who Christ was.

Peterson Portrait Lecturing
Photo by Adam Jacobs – Peterson Lecture, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=57264962

Renewing Interest in the Bible

Dr. Peterson explains why the Bible is profoundly meaningful and, as Bishop Barron says in his podcast The Word on Fire Show WOF117: Who Is Jordan Peterson?  is ‘uncovering a dimension of these texts which is very life-giving and illuminating.’

He says that the clinical psychologist has brought to light once more why Scripture matters and is ‘recovering the power of those texts’. They are not dead myths, which prominent atheists would have us believe, otherwise they couldn’t have lasted so long and had such influence.

As a direct result of Dr. Peterson’s work, it has become ‘cool’ to read the Bible. I found two very encouraging comments posted on Bishop Robert Barron’s podcast on Dr. Peterson:

“Jordan Peterson and Bishop Barron are the two biggest reasons why I’m getting confirmed Catholic tomorrow 😀. God bless you both”

“…I was a cradle catholic and left the church when I was 18….I went to my first confession in 20 years last month and have gone to every service since Ash Wednesday thanks to Dr Peterson’s work. I’ve even picked up the Bible.. it is like a switch has been flipped.”

What a resounding endorsement!

Bishop Barron states that Dr. Peterson believes deeply in the texts of the Bible and is spreading the message that faith in them is a matter of life and death. This is most definitely the Christian viewpoint!

Where Peterson’s Views Diverge from Catholicism

 

Bishop Barron
Bishop Robert Barron
By Frank Licorice [CC BY-SA 2.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons
On the topic of whether Dr. Peterson’s views are Christian, Bishop Barron is scrupulously fair. He stresses that the author doesn’t claim to be a Christian theologian nor a Christian – he’s looking at the Bible from a purely psychological viewpoint.

 

Dr. Peterson is an avid follower of Jung, who said that the first great psychologists were the early Church Fathers. Yet in his video Bishop Barron on the Jordan Peterson Phenomenon  the bishop cautions that the psychologist’s ideas verge on Gnosticism – the idea that only a few cognoscenti can know Christianity. Wikipedia describes one of the Gnostic core teachings as ‘To achieve salvation, one needs to get in touch with secret knowledge.’

Bishop Barron’s other concern with Gnostics is that they tend to ‘bracket the historical references in these biblical texts,’ thereby ignoring the reality of events in the Bible. The bishop reminds us that, rather than being philosophical or psychological, ‘Christianity is stubbornly historical.’ It matters that God really did become man, that He really did rise from the dead. Those are historical facts.

Christ is not an archetype, as Dr. Peterson describes Him – He is not a myth. The ‘myth’ of Christ is firmly grounded in history.

Myths are not rooted in a specific time or place: they happened ‘once upon a time’ and ‘in a faraway galaxy.’ Jesus Christ was ‘crucified under Pontius Pilate.’ We know who Pilate was, where he lived and when. The New Testament may contain mythical elements but is also historical: the Church stubbornly insists on that.

Bishop Barron says the problem with liberal theology is that it sees God ‘as the deep background music of life.’ Biblical theology says that God ‘is a Person who acts in history and has purposes and it is the primacy of God’s Grace that breaks into my life and changes me.’

Bishop Barron endorses Dr. Peterson’s book but cautions us against the Gnostic tendencies in it.

Is Dr. Peterson a Christian?

He makes frequent statements that suggest a belief in God. For example, ‘you have a spark of the divine in you, which belongs not to you, but to God.’ Yet when asked in interviews he declines to come down on one side or the other.

About the Resurrection, he says that the literal (historical) and metaphysical (archetypal) sometimes touch – and that is a miracle. He is not excluding the possibility that the Resurrection truly happened. He is simply unsure about its historical truth and needs another three years to go into it.

Bishop Barron has no problem with that. He suggests we look at St. Paul, who after his encounter with the Risen Christ went to Arabia for three years to sort himself out before coming back to preach the Gospel.  Dr. Peterson is in good company.

 

The bishop regards Dr. Peterson as a spiritual father for young men, whom the psychologist says are starving for direction. Spiritual masters who give spiritual instruction are what they need, according to Bishop Barron, who adds that priests would do well to talk in the same manner as the author of the 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos.

Therefore I feel confident that Dr. Jordan Peterson will be a good influence on Joe. He will encourage the teenager to read the Bible. He will urge him to overcome his suffering by being the hero who takes responsibility for his actions and makes the world a better place.

Using him as a spiritual adviser to Joe is not a bad place to start.

Where do you stand on Dr. Jordan Peterson? Let me know in the comments – I’d love to hear from you!

Resources:

12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos

The Word on Fire Show WOF117: Who Is Jordan Peterson?

Bishop Barron on the Jordan Peterson Phenomenon

 

 

A Father Michael Book, A Look Behind the Books, Christian inspirational Fiction, Gabe the rescue horse, rescue horse update, Riding Out the Wreckage, Uncategorized

Update on Gabriel

Here are a couple of photos of Gabriel, aka Little Gabe, after arriving in his new home:

At new home 2

Being welcomed by the daughter of the family who has adopted him.

At new home 1

Checking out his new BFF next door.

 

Meanwhile, back in my writer’s seat:

I’ve FINALLY finished the outline of “Riding Out the Wreckage” and can now start writing!

The process is somewhat hampered by the fact that my husband and I are in the middle of selling our house in Maryland and moving farther south. He wants Sarasota, Florida, yours truly would like to compromise by finding a house in Hilton Head, South Carolina.

While we duke it out we’ll be  staying with my mother-in-law in Sarasota.

Before that my gelding, Cruz Bay will get his first full clip EVER in the whole of his 18 years. It will help him handle the heat once he steps off the truck at his new – and hopefully, temporary – boarding barn nearby.

He leaves for his two day trip, with overnight stay along the way, on Monday, 2nd April. I will fly down the next day to meet him but have to fly back out the next morning to finish getting the house emptied and ready for our closing on Friday, 6th April.

It is going to be very hard to leave my friends of 12 years and I’m not looking forward to it.

Writing “Wreckage” will become my refuge in those dark moments when I feel lost. My next post will probably be written in Florida. I’ll send photos of white egrets, alligators and other exotic fauna!

I leave you with the proforma cover of the last book of The Father Michael Trilogy.

Wreckage Book Cover

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christian inspirational Fiction, healing horses, Noah the rescue horse, rescue horse update, Riding Out the Wager, Uncategorized, Veterans with PTSD

Noah’s New Life

I thought you might like an update on Noah, the skinny Thoroughbred gelding I fostered for a while from Freedom Hill Horse Rescue in Maryland.

If you recall, he was the inspiration for my latest book “Riding Out the Wager” together with Kevin Murphy, the veteran with PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) who adopted him.  Kevin will be starting an equine therapy program for veterans like himself and Noah will be one of the horses helping heal them.

Kevin was then redeployed to Iraq. It was a nerve-wracking time for his wife and children, as well as difficult for someone who had just beaten his debilitating disorder.

During that time I wrote the book, and Noah was getting used to his new home and pasture buddy, Bijou.

While her husband was overseas, his wife became concerned that the two horses were fighting instead of becoming fast friends. But it turned out that the two of them were just learning to play with each other!

It must have been an absolute age since Noah had fun with another horse or been comfortable enough around one to even start a game. In all likelihood he had never had this opportunity his entire life.

And now he has become a member of the family, as you can see from these photos. 🙂

Noah w Kevin's Kid on backNoah with another Kevin kid on back

Noah with yet another Kevin kid on back